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Privacy Policy: the Anthology of Surveillance Poetics

Privacy Policy: the Anthology of Surveillance Poetics

    Poetry. Drones, phone taps, NSA leaks, internet tracking—the headlines confirm it—we are living in a state of constant surveillance, and the idea of "the private sphere" is no longer what it used to be. PRIVACY POLICY: THE ANTHOLOGY OF SURVEILLANCE POETICS responds to this timely and crucial issue through the voices of over fifty contemporary poets, including Robert Pinsky, Jorie Graham, John Ashbery, Rae Armantrout, Nikki Giovanni, and D.A. Powell. Nature, ethics, technology, sex, the internet—no voyeuristic stone goes unturned in this expansive exploration of the individual, information, and how we are watched.

    Contributors: Emily Abendroth, Nick Admussen, Rae Armantrout, John Ashbery, Ken Babstock, Mary Jo Bang, Jessica Baran, Micah Bateman, Mark Bibbins, Melissa Broder, Stephen Burt, Dan Chelotti, Feng Chen, Paula Cisewski, David Clewell, Victoria Chang, Joshua Clover, CAConrad, Michael Earl Craig, Andrew Durbin, Ben Fama, Graham Foust, Nikki Giovanni, Eileen G'Sell, Elisa Gabbert, Jorie Graham, Richard Greenfield, Joe Hall, Max Hjortsberg, Harmony Holiday, Cathy Park Hong, Joanna Kaminski, Amy King, John Kinsella, Hoa Nguyen, Noelle Kocot, EJ Koh, Jennifer Kronovet, Dorothea Lasky, Anthony McCann, Maureen N. McLane, Joyelle McSweeney, Ben Mirov, Ange Mlinko, Paul Muldoon, Eileen Myles, Carrie Oeding, Robert Pinsky, D.A. Powell, Jed Rasula, Matthew Rohrer, Dana Roeser, Raphael Rubinstein, Tomaz Salamun, Zach Savich, Danniel Schoonebeek, Damion Searls, Tim Seibles, Kent Shaw, Mónica de la Torre, Jean Valentine, Joni Wallace, Thera Webb, Dara Wier, Joshua Marie Wilkinson, and Matthew Zapruder.

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    privacy, policy, anthology, surveillance, poetics
    Privacy on the Ground: Driving Corporate Behavior in the United States and Europe (Information Policy)

    Privacy on the Ground: Driving Corporate Behavior in the United States and Europe (Information Policy)

    • Privacy on the Ground Driving Corporate Behavior in the United States and Europe Information Policy

    An examination of corporate privacy management in the United States, Germany, Spain, France, and the United Kingdom, identifying international best practices and making policy recommendations.

    Barely a week goes by without a new privacy revelation or scandal. Whether by hackers or spy agencies or social networks, violations of our personal information have shaken entire industries, corroded relations among nations, and bred distrust between democratic governments and their citizens. Polls reflect this concern, and show majorities for more, broader, and stricter regulation -- to put more laws "on the books." But there was scant evidence of how well tighter regulation actually worked "on the ground" in changing corporate (or government) behavior -- until now.

    This intensive five-nation study goes inside corporations to examine how the people charged with protecting privacy actually do their work, and what kinds of regulation effectively shape their behavior. And the research yields a surprising result. The countries with more ambiguous regulation -- Germany and the United States -- had the strongest corporate privacy management practices, despite very different cultural and legal environments. The more rule-bound countries -- like France and Spain -- trended instead toward compliance processes, not embedded privacy practices. At a crucial time, when Big Data and the Internet of Things are snowballing, Privacy on the Ground helpfully searches out the best practices by corporations, provides guidance to policymakers, and offers important lessons for everyone concerned with privacy, now and in the future.



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    privacy, ground, driving, corporate, behavior, united, states, europe, information, policy
    The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto: Getting from Policy to Code to QA to Value

    The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto: Getting from Policy to Code to QA to Value

      "It's our thesis that privacy will be an integral part of the next wave in the technology revolution and that innovators who are emphasizing privacy as an integral part of the product life cycle are on the right track." --The authors of The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto

      The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto: Getting from Policy to Code to QA to Value is the first book of its kind, offering industry-proven solutions that go beyond mere theory and adding lucid perspectives on the challenges and opportunities raised with the emerging "personal" information economy.

      The authors, a uniquely skilled team of longtime industry experts, detail how you can build privacy into products, processes, applications, and systems. The book offers insight on translating the guiding light of OECD Privacy Guidelines, the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs), Generally Accepted Privacy Principles (GAPP) and Privacy by Design (PbD) into concrete concepts that organizations, software/hardware engineers, and system administrators/owners can understand and apply throughout the product or process life cycle—regardless of development methodology—from inception to retirement, including data deletion and destruction.

      In addition to providing practical methods to applying privacy engineering methodologies, the authors detail how to prepare and organize an enterprise or organization to support and manage products, process, systems, and applications that require personal information. The authors also address how to think about and assign value to the personal information assets being protected. Finally, the team of experts offers thoughts about the information revolution that has only just begun, and how we can live in a world of sensors and trillions of data points without losing our ethics or value(s)...and even have a little fun.

      The Privacy Engineer's Manifesto is designed to serve multiple stakeholders: Anyone who is involved in designing, developing, deploying and reviewing products, processes, applications, and systems that process personal information, including software/hardware engineers, technical program and product managers, support and sales engineers, system integrators, IT professionals, lawyers, and information privacy and security professionals. This book is a must-read for all practitioners in the personal information economy.

      Privacy will be an integral part of the next wave in the technology revolution; innovators who emphasize privacy as an integral part of the product life cycle are on the right track.

      Foreword by Dr. Eric Bonabeau, PhD, Chairman, Icosystem, Inc. & Dean of Computational Sciences, Minerva Schools at KGI.

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      privacy, engineers, manifesto, getting, policy, value
      Big Data and Competition Policy

      Big Data and Competition Policy

        Big Data and Big Analytics are a big deal today. Big Data is playing a pivotal role in many companies' strategic decision-making. Companies are striving to acquire a 'data advantage' over rivals. Data-driven mergers are increasing. These data-driven business strategies and mergers raise significant implications for privacy, consumer protection and competition law. At the same time, European and United States' competition authorities are beginning to consider the implications of a data-driven economy on competition policy. In 2015, the European Commission launched a competition inquiry into the e-commerce sector and issued a statement of objections in its Google investigation. The implications of Big Data on competition policy will likely be a part of the mix.

        Big Data and Competition Policy is the first work to offer a detailed description of the important new issue of Big Data and explains how it relates to competition laws and policy, both in the EU and US. The book helps bring the reader quickly up to speed on what is Big Data, its competitive implications, the competition authorities' approach to data-driven mergers and business strategies, and their current approach's strengths and weaknesses.

        Written by two recognized leading experts in competition law, this accessible work offers practical guidance and theoretical discussion of the potential benefits (including data-driven efficiencies) and concerns for the practitioner, policy maker, and academic alike.


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        competition, policy
        Federal Trade Commission Privacy Law and Policy

        Federal Trade Commission Privacy Law and Policy

          The Federal Trade Commission, a US agency created in 1914 to police the problem of 'bigness', has evolved into the most important regulator of information privacy - and thus innovation policy - in the world. Its policies profoundly affect business practices and serve to regulate most of the consumer economy. In short, it now regulates our technological future. Despite its stature, however, the agency is often poorly understood by observers and even those who practice before it. This volume by Chris Jay Hoofnagle - an internationally recognized scholar with more than fifteen years of experience interacting with the FTC - is designed to redress this confusion by explaining how the FTC arrived at its current position of power. It will be essential reading for lawyers, legal academics, political scientists, historians and anyone else interested in understanding the FTC's privacy activities and how they fit in the context of the agency's broader consumer protection mission.

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          federal, trade, commission, privacy, policy
          Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

          Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

            Longlisted for the National Book Award
            New York Times Bestseller

            A former Wall Street quant sounds an alarm on the mathematical models that pervade modern life — and threaten to rip apart our social fabric


            We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.

            But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.

            Tracing the arc of a person’s life, O’Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These “weapons of math destruction” score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health.

            O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.

            — Longlist for National Book Award (Non-Fiction)
            — Goodreads, semi-finalist for the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards (Science and Technology)
            — Kirkus, Best Books of 2016
            New York Times, 100 Notable Books of 2016 (Non-Fiction)
            The Guardian, Best Books of 2016
            — WBUR's "On Point," Best Books of 2016: Staff Picks
            — Boston Globe, Best Books of 2016, Non-Fiction

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            weapons, destruction, increases, inequality, threatens, democracy
            Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life

            Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life

            • Used Book in Good Condition
            Privacy is one of the most urgent issues associated with information technology and digital media. This book claims that what people really care about when they complain and protest that privacy has been violated is not the act of sharing information itself―most people understand that this is crucial to social life ―but the inappropriate, improper sharing of information. Arguing that privacy concerns should not be limited solely to concern about control over personal information, Helen Nissenbaum counters that information ought to be distributed and protected according to norms governing distinct social contexts―whether it be workplace, health care, schools, or among family and friends. She warns that basic distinctions between public and private, informing many current privacy policies, in fact obscure more than they clarify. In truth, contemporary information systems should alarm us only when they function without regard for social norms and values, and thereby weaken the fabric of social life.

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            privacy, context, technology, policy, integrity, social
            Privacy, Security and Accountability: Ethics, Law and Policy

            Privacy, Security and Accountability: Ethics, Law and Policy

              What is the appropriate balance between privacy, security, and accountability? What do we owe each other in terms of information sharing and access? Why is privacy valuable and is it more or less important than other values like security or free speech? Is Edward Snowden a hero or villain?

              Within democratic societies, privacy, security, and accountability are seen as important values that must be balanced appropriately. If there is too much privacy, then there may be too little accountability – and more alarmingly, too little security. On the other hand, where there is too little privacy, individuals may not have the space to grow, experiment, and engage in practices not generally accepted by the majority. Moreover, allowing overly limited control over access to and uses of private places and information may itself be a threat to security.

              By clarifying the moral, legal, and social foundations of privacy, security, and accountability, this book helps determine the appropriate balance between these contested values. Twelve specially commissioned essays provide the ideal resource for students and academics in information and applied ethics.

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              privacy, security, accountability, ethics, policy
              The Governance of Privacy: Policy Instruments in Global Perspective (MIT Press)

              The Governance of Privacy: Policy Instruments in Global Perspective (MIT Press)

                Analyzes privacy policy instruments available to contemporary industrial states, from government regulations and transnational regimes to self-regulation and privacy enhancing technologies.

                Privacy protection, according to Colin Bennett and Charles Raab, involves politics and public policy as much as it does law and technology. Moreover, the protection of our personal information in a globalized, borderless world means that privacy-related policies are inextricably interdependent. In this updated paperback edition of The Governance of Privacy, Bennett and Raab analyze a broad range of privacy policy instruments available to contemporary advanced industrial states, from government regulations and transnational regimes to self-regulation and privacy-enhancing technologies. They consider two possible dynamics of privacy regulation -- a "race to the bottom," with competitive deregulation by countries eager to attract global investment in information technology, versus "a race to the top," with the progressive establishment of global privacy standards.

                Bennett and Raab begin by discussing the goals of privacy protection, the liberal and individualist assumptions behind it, and the neglected relationship between privacy and social equity. They describe and evaluate different policy instruments, including the important 1995 Directive on Data Protection from the European Union, as well as the general efficacy of the "top-down" statutory approach and self-regulatory and technological alternatives to it. They evaluate the interrelationships of these policy instruments and their position in a global framework of regulation and policy by state and non-state actors. And finally, they consider whether all of this policy activity at international, national, and corporate levels necessarily means higher levels of privacy protection.



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                governance, privacy, policy, instruments, global, perspective, press
                Things that Can and Cannot Be Said: Essays and Conversations

                Things that Can and Cannot Be Said: Essays and Conversations

                • Haymarket Books
                In late 2014, Arundhati Roy, John Cusack, and Daniel Ellsberg travelled to Moscow to meet with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

                The result was a series of essays and dialogues in which Roy and Cusack reflect on their conversations with Snowden.

                In these provocative and penetrating discussions, Roy and Cusack discuss the nature of the state, empire, and surveillance in an era of perpetual war, the meaning of flags and patriotism, the role of foundations and NGOs in limiting dissent, and the ways in which capital but not people can freely cross borders.

                Arundhati Roy is a writer and global justice activist. From her celebrated Booker Prize–winning novel The God of Small Things, to her prolific output of writing on topics ranging from climate change to war, the perils of free-market "development" in India, and the defense of the poor, Roy's voice has become indispensable to millions seeking a better word.

                John Cusack is a writer, filmmaker, and a board member of the Freedom of the Press Foundation. He has written the screenplays for the movies Grosse Point Blank, High Fidelity, and War, Inc., with Mark Leyner and Jeremy Pikser, among many others. His writing has appeared widely, including the Guardian, Truthout, and Outlook India




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                things, cannot, essays, conversations
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